Posters

GUIDELINES FOR PRESENTATIONS
Poster format or audio-visual clip

A. PURPOSE

  • An visual (poster) or audio-visual (video, audio clip) support for a very brief introduction to explain who you are, the name of the project your represent and its goals and objectives.
  • Participants will be able to associate you with the poster or audiovisual clip and you will be able to refer to it during the event when explaining more details to interested participants.
  • The product may have other presentation uses beyond the workshop, so you are welcome to take the posters with you after the workshop is complete.

B. CONTENT

PROJECT IDENTIFICATION

  • Name
  • Location
  • Contact information
  • Geographic and thematic coverage
  • Duration.

PROJECT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

PROJECT PARTNERS

  • Who you work with
  • Who does what

HOW IS THE PROJECT UNIQUE, WHAT IT OFFERS

  • Recent activities and important events
  • Publications, websites, audiovisual materials

BEYOND THE PROJECT

  • What is to be sustained beyond the project

EVALUATION CHALLENGES

  • Existing evaluation plans
  • Challenges that you will be exploring during the workshop

C. DESIGN

  • Use as many visuals as possible (photos of partners, of activities of products, of places)
  • Use as little text as possible (to allow for larger fonts size)
  • Use quotes from partners to bring the project to life
  • Be creative, experiment

Further hints are available at: http://www.ncsu.edu/project/posters/IndexStart.html

A Poster Uses Visual Grammar

A poster is not just a standard research paper stuck to a board.
An effective poster uses a different, visual grammar.
It shows, not tells. It expresses your points in graphical terms.

It avoids visual chaos, with many jagged edges or various-sized boards that distract the viewer. Instead, it guides the viewer by using a visual logic, with an hierarchical structure that emphasizes the main points.

All elements, even the figure legends, are visible from 4 feet away.

It displays the essential content – the messages – in the title, main headings and graphics. It indicates the relative importance of elements graphically: each main point is stated in large type-face headings; details are subordinated visually, using smaller type-face. The main headings explain the points, rather than merely stating “results” and letting the viewer hunt for – or even worse, invent – the message.

More tips at this site: about presentations

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